The Invasion of the Tearling [The Queen of Tearling #2] by Erika Johansen – A review

The Invasion of the Tearling (The Queen of the Tearling, #2)The Invasion of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

Genre : Fantasy, Magic
Audience: Mature (18+)
Type : Series (Book 2)
My rating: 3 of 5 stars ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
Buy Online: Amazon

A coming-of-age novel and the second book of the series, The Queen of Tearling is an arduous read with a payoff in the end.

This story picks off from the conclusion of the first novel, telling us the story of Kaelsea and her entourage.

We get more of the Tearling and some in-depth character development of all the main players. We learn about who’s who; their back stories, deepest, darkest secrets and their vices.

The tone of the book is slightly dark and gory. It has some 18+ scenes that I did not enjoy. The savagery, the blood and gore are crucial to the story, but I found myself retching at them.

Reading Progress Invasion of the Tearling

The pacing was slower than book 1 (The Queen of Tearling). Throughout the book I was urging the story to move on and accelerate. Sometimes I even shook my fists with frustration at the author, asking her to get on with it, because I had too many questions that needed answers.

Who is her father ?
What happened to lily ?
Why are Lily and Kelsea connected ?
How are they connected ?
How is the Red Queen related to all this ?
What do the sapphires actually do ?
Where is the Fetch and what is his background ?
How about Mace and Thorne? Will Kelsea ever be a good queen ?
Was her mother truly her mother at all ?

So many questions !

I was completely invested in the characters. Superb characterization, I’ll give it to her. The people like Mace, Thorne, Arliss and Finn are well done and portrayed so well.

My adoration of the characters comes to a halt at the protagonist. I can hardly understand her. Sometimes she does stupid things. Sometimes she does really brave things. I had an image of Kelsea in the first book that totally blew me. She was the brave, strong, courageous girl who was given the Queenship of Tearling and the terrible responsibility of redeeming her mother and saving the people from the evil Red Queen. What happened to her now ? 🙁 What will she do in the future? (Guess I’ll find out in book 3)

Overall, the story is slow to pickup and doesn’t make sense half the time. There is a secondary story arc that catpults you to somewhere entirely different from The Tearling and makes you wonder if you are in fact reading the same novel. But, let me tell you, it all ties up in the end. The pacing picks up rapidly after 70% and you’ll be at the edge of your seat wishing for more than two eyes so you can read faster.

A fantastic story (albeit verbose) that will thrill you, entertain you and captivate you.

P.S. For those of you interested, here’s the review of book 1 >> http://bit.ly/2qdTBFL

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Jonathan Strange and Mr.Norrel by Susanna Clarke: A review

Jonathan Strange and Mr NorrellJonathan Strange and Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke

My rating: 5 of 5 stars ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
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The book that made me exercise my biceps. The book that made me LOL without a break. The book that is an epitome of dry humor and sarcasm.

What I felt about it
A completely unique and original story from an author who knows what she’s doing. It was a slow-burner and had lots of little tidbits in the footnotes. It is an elaborate read, but I liked it. It was a nice change of pace from all the murder mysteries I’ve been reading. I liked the fact that there were no dirty words or stuff and the story was clean of double entendres. I really wish that we can all start reading and writing more stories like this. This book is a collectible, worthy of sitting in the best bookshelf on every reader’s home library. I think that this book deserves more popularity and more praise. Amazing piece of work, Susanna Clarke. I could kiss you for writing this beautiful story.

Reading Progress

JSAMR Reading Progress 1JSAMR Reading Progress 2JSAMR Reading Progress 3JSAMR Reading Progress 4JSAMR Reading Progress 5

Storytelling
There is no question in my mind about the brilliance of this book. It deserves five stars and more stars and more awards and more accolades than what it has received right now. JSAMR is the story of the titular magicians striving to bring back (lost) magic to England in the 1800s. What is not to like about this premise? It has magic, it has humor, it has elaborate narrative AND it is set in the best age of British history.

The first thing that strikes you about the book is how heavy the thing is from all of its 1000 pages and its humor. The book oozes sarcasm. The narrative thrives on dry humor. The story exudes clever witticism. Naturally, all credit goes to the brilliant, BRILLIANT author, Susanna Clarke.

I mean, if I had to talk about her narrative then I’d need a whole day. Seriously. Her use of premonition in revealing key characters, plot twists and story elements is insanely clever! The novel is rich in footnotes that tell us more about this world she is building. The footnotes give us lots of insights into our characters and many, tiny branching stories.

It’s like a thousand stories within one big story

Characters
Mr. Norrel – The one that is secretive – secretly jealous, secretly afraid, secretly sincere.
Jonathan Strange – The one who is likable, friendly, jovial and talented.
Childermass – The one who appears very rarely but the one you miss the most.
Arabella Strange – The one who sets the bar for wives all over England.
Lady Pole – The one who looks like a butterfly but stings like a bee.
Mr. Honeyfoot – The one who should have had his foot in his mouth, honey.
Drawlight, Mr. Lascelles – The ones who are supposed to be comic reliefs but whom you hate.
Vinculus – The one that shocks you with his story.
John Uskglass – The one you want more of.
The Fairy – The mean one that you were happy to see defeated.
Stephen – The one you root for.

JSAMR in short:
Length : 1006 pages (!!!)
Author : The Sarcastic Susanna Clarke
Genre : Historical Fiction
Tone : Funny-as-hell
Why you should NOT read JSAMR: Only for the plot
Why you should read JSAMR: Purely for the sarcasm

Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman: A review

Norse MythologyNorse Mythology by Neil Gaiman
My rating: 4 of 5 stars ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
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I love Neil Gaiman’s stories. In fact, I am crazy about his work. I have been waiting since December for the release of this novel. And when I finally got it, I devoured in a few hours. Here’s what I felt about the book.

Norse Mythology, is firstly an anthology of some of the well-known stories of the Norse Gods like Odin, Thor and Loki. My exposure to Norse Mythology was so far only restricted to what Marvel decided to show me. I knew of the mighty Thor in the skin of Chris Hemsworth and the handsome and sly Loki through Tom Hiddleston.

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This book is a journey of these characters – their origin, their adventures, their plays and finally, their end. The last chapter, Ragnarok, was truly exciting and filled with adrenaline rushes. It got me excited for Thor -Ragnarok.

Yet, something was missing.

Listening to Neil Gaiman’s narrations was a joy, as usual. He was brilliant as ever.

Yet, something was missing.

Loki, the ever mischievous and sly fox among the Gods played the role of ‘Narada Muni‘. Loki meddles in the business of the Gods and creates troubles for them. But, at the end of the day, it is Loki who saves them. I laughed out at his antics and his bashful-but-not-bashful smile. It seemed like Loki was the life and laughter of the otherwise grim Gods of the Norsemen.

Loki is an interesting character. I believe Marvel did perfect justice by choosing Tom Hiddleston to play the role of the God.

You resented him even when you were at your most grateful, and you were grateful to him even when you hated him the most.

Yet, something was missing.

Brutality is in the nature of the brave Vikings. When I think of Vikings, I think of the beefy men in their horned iron helmets and braided red beards; I think of pillaging, pub fights and raucous merriment. Norse Gods stay true to this description. Only a handful of them seem to possess brains in addition to brawns and even fewer of them seem to want knowledge. [Odin has to sacrifice an eye to drink from the Well of Wisdom and later, his life to understand Runes].

“The Norse myths are the myths of a chilly place, with long, long winter nights and endless summer days, myths of a people who did not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them.”

The Vikings valued bravery and brute strength, as displayed by Thor. This rowdy nature of the Gods endeared them to me.

Yet, something was missing.
The something missing is something that I can’t put my finger on. Maybe I’m refusing to put my finger on it because I love Neil Gaiman. 

NG narration

Norse Mythology felt like a book that anybody could have written with research. I was reminded that it was Neil Gaiman’s writing in very few instances of the book. A difference only an ardent NG fan will be able to discern, I’m sure. To the rest of the world, this is a collection of wonderful stories.

Never mind, I can assuage my gripes about the writing by listening to the audiobook. Neil Gaiman’s narration stands tall and unparalleled.

I was reminded of another similar book that I read recently. It was also an anthology; It also had stories from Mythology; It was written and intended for a much simpler audience. The Serpent’s Revenge: Unusual Tales from the Mahabharata

Sudha Murthy’s writing style is familiar to me. She has been writing stories for many years and her simple, effective words can affect the deepest parts of me. Simple but powerful. I’ve come to expect that of Sudha Murthy ji.

I wonder if Gaiman’s target was similar. Did he want to simplify and tell the stories without touching them with his trademark literary Midas touch?

To be honest, some stories were just plain boring. My least favorite one is the one that doesn’t have Loki in it – The Mead of Poetry. Odin was terribly dull in that one. Maybe, one long story would have done in the place of 15? I don’t know.

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I guess I wasn’t setting my expectations right.

The best way to go about reading Norse Mythology is to plunge into this book without expectations. Then your appetite for Norse Mythology will be whetted; But whether or not your Neil Gaiman starvation will get satiated is left to the individual. Personally, it wasn’t. When I finished the book, it felt like this wasn’t enough. I needed more.

I’d definitely add this to my library, but I’ll be reading this less as a bedtime story and more as a “wikipedia page” for reference.

The Trials of Apollo [The Hidden Oracle #1] by Rick Riordan: A review

The Trials of Apollo, Book One: The Hidden OracleThe Trials of Apollo, Book One: The Hidden Oracle by Rick Riordan
My rating: 3 of 5 stars ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
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Okay, so this wasn’t a great book by Rick Riordan’s standards.

I didn’t have any expectations for this story from the beginning, because the god Apollo didn’t excite me very much. I was right. Apollo’s narcissism put me off completely. I would have enjoyed it for less than 40 pages before I grew tired of it. And to think that this goes on and on and on for the entire book! Seeshsh!!

  • To be honest, I didn’t like the plot that much either. ‘The world is under threat and Apollo and friends are the only ones who can save it‘, is really not such a great plot point, after we have seen Percy Jackson and Jason Grace do literally the same thing over and over again.
  • There weren’t many creatures from the Greek mythology, which was a huge disappointment.
  • Apart from Meg, none of the characters stood out for me (Apollo was an overdose).
  • The humor was really good in some portions but it didn’t carry the story, it felt like a laughter track introduced as an afterthought.

Looks like the only, ONLY reason I’d be reading the next book is because LEO will be in it!!

A story can’t be a great story if the protagonist puts me off and cameo characters (Percy and Leo) excite me more than the eponymous character (Apollo).

The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery: A review

The Little PrinceThe Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
My rating: 4 of 5 stars ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
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The awesomeness of this book might be lost to somebody who isn’t aware of psychology.

In psychotherapy, concepts like Inner child, Emotional literacy and Flow are explained in detail with many serious terminologies. But this story captures the essence of all that in a few simple and profound words.

Isn’t that the beauty of stories?

I was both happy and disappointed with the language used because in some places the dialogues were so intense that they triggered extreme guilt and sadness in me. I felt that the tone could have been gentler in such places. I felt downright shameful in some chapters.

“…and it is of some use to my flower that I own them. But you are of no use to the stars…”

Woah. Tone it down a notch.

I was a sucker for the conceptualization of Inner Child in this book. The innocence, the incessant questions, the curiosity, the ability to see the beauty of the rose and to appreciate the value of beauty are all characteristics of a child. These are portrayed exceptionally well. These characteristics are shown and spoken of directly and with a rawness.

What I loved best about ‘The Little Prince’ is the flexibility of the metaphors. Here, the haughty rose can be equated with ‘Love’ or ‘Innocence of childhood’. Either metaphor works well. So this book is to be read by each individual with their own interpretations and meanings.

How you enjoy this book depends on how imaginative your inner child is!

The Palace of Illusions by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni: A review

The Palace Of Illusions by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni
My rating: 5 of 5 stars ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
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How can you tell an ancient story in new light? And how can you tell it to a generation, who as children have literally grown up with this story, and as adults will have high expectations of it?

Chitra Bannerjee Divakaruni has the answer in The Palace of Illusions.

The story of Mahabharata is nothing new to me. A kingdom greater than any – cousins fighting for the throne – sacrifices, promises, boons, curses – war – bereavement – atonement. An epic. The Mahabharata is an elaborate story, which can be perceived from any character’s point-of-view and still have a rich storytelling experience. So, why not tell in from a woman’s perspective?

While I was growing up, Mahabharata was always about the virtues of the brave men who went to war. There wasn’t one story about what it was to be a woman during those epic times. This book is the wonderful tale of the woman who was the cornerstone of Mahabharata. Told in first person, this tale takes us to the depth of Draupadi’s soul and shows us her views as the events of the great epic unfurl.

THE MODERN DRAUPADI

The best part about The Palace of Illusions was that, as a modern woman, I felt very connected to Draupadi. How Chitra ji manages to walk the fine line between the old and new interpretations of the character of a ‘strong woman’ is beyond me!

The author mixes the right amount of fiction into the archaic tale without taking away its original flavor. I mean, I have never heard of Draupadi’s love story in the original. The new Draupati falls in love with Karna when she sees him at her Swayamvar. Her love for him is only intensified after her marriage and she yearns for him all her life. Here’s why I think it might be true: a woman with high ambitions would see Karna as an achiever. She would find him capable and deserving of her love not only because he is wise, brave and handsome but also because he would respect her and treat her like the Queen she is. So, despite her fate, every time she sees him her heart gives a jolt. He was her one true love, until the end. Draupadi is a fire born princess with lofty goals for her life. Sadly, none of them come true when she married the Pandavas. It is only fair that she keep thinking of where things went wrong for her and wondering if she married the right guy(s).

Draupadi’s love story arc comes as a surprise because I have never imagined this possibility before! I just assumed that Draupadi accepted her life and marriage with satisfaction. The version that we have all been given has been avoiding a crucial detail about her character – Draupadi is a woman driven by resentment and regret of her own choices. How could she be happy in that miserable married life? Have we been painting Draupadi as a meek martyr when she clearly was much more?

five husbands

It was a new take on Panchaali and I think it fits her perfectly. Brilliant interpretation Chitra ji! It might or might not be true. I don’t know if other interpretations tell the story the same way, but you have convinced me of your interpretation so beautifully, that now I begin to wonder if your version is the original version and if the truth somehow got diluted in the million re-tellings.

DRAUPADI – A CHARACTER SKETCH

Where do I begin? Wow.

Never have I ever read a story with a POV with such strong intentions and inner monologue. The story in The Palace of Illusions is the story of Draupadi from birth to death. She was a woman beyond her times. She was headstrong, intelligent, virtuous (in her own way), ambitious, proud and was a feminist believing that the place of a woman is not just in the back of the palace, but right next to her royal husband.

Draupadi bow and arrow

Emotionally, we see the bitterness that shapes up Panchaali from the start. We see her angry, we see her withdraw, we see her contemplate, we see her lash out in blind fury, we see her curious, we see her loving. As the story progresses, the insight into Panchaali’s inner doubts and fears become much our own. We see the princess who felt like a misfit at her own dad’s place but eventually found a home in The Palace of Illusions. My heart goes out to her.

Panchaali’s story is that of a woman so blindly confident of her unique destiny that she brought about her own misfortunes. Her pride fell. And then, she grew, learnt humility, kindness, surrender and acceptance. She grew to find a woman’s power in her. She grew to identify her devotion to Krishna, and her love for him which is beyond body and mind.

courtroom scene

I admit it. Usually when I think of Draupati, I only think of her shame and her terrible fate at the hands of Dushasha. I was so wrong. I hadn’t given her much credit. Understanding Draupadi’s background and her character was a privilege. It was amazing. I understood the bottled-up rage and fury against her husbands, the shame that befell the pride of the Queen of the Pandavas and the surrender that sparked from desperation and her love and devotion to Krishna.

Understanding Draupadi’s background and her character was a privilege. It was amazing to fill in the emotional blanks that I had of Mahabharata when it comes to Draupadi.

 

draupadi-mahabharat-star-plus

Throughout the story we see other women of her age – Sudheshana, Banumati, Subadra, Uttara. None of them even compare to her. None of them even come close to The Fire Princess! Not even Kunti, who after a point accepts that it isn’t her place to rule over what the Panchali says. And that is the most inspiring part of Panchaali’s story for me.

CHITRA’S WONDERFUL STORYTELLING

The author/poet has a way with words. Her words flow like honey and read like a poem. I was completely in love with her words while reading the book.

Chitra ji’s art of storytelling comes out in the most unlikely places. Her idea to interpret Mahabharata from a new perspective is seen even in short snippets. For instance, we all know the part where Arjun and Duryodhan ask Krishna to join them in the war. In this story, this incident is told from Duryodhan’s point of view, meaning we are privy to his arrogance and utter confidence in his victory, in contrast to the third-person, moralistic tale we have been hearing so far.

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While telling a tale of this magnificent scale it’s impossible to avoid villains. Sometimes, flawed characters need to remain flawed. Chitra ji’s story had the compulsive need to seek goodness in flawed characters, and that felt far-fetched. It is okay for the characters to have chinks in their armors. I felt that the reasons the author gives to justify them were mere excuses. I just feel that when writing POV, it’s okay not to idolize everyone.

Chitra ji brings out the chemistry between Panchaali and Kunti (the original Saas Bahu drama!) in a few entertaining pages. She has an ease of telling didactic incidents with a funny twist. She just told a convincing Mahabharata in less than 400 pages. I admire that. Well done!

PROS:
1) A fresh viewpoint
2) Intense
3) Unapologetically human
4) Short, quick chapters
5) One-word chapter names (I love one-word chapter names)
6) Stays true to the original Mahabharata

CONS:
1) Difficult to read as a Mahabharata virgin. Should be familiar with the original story.
2) Glorifies almost everyone

The Palace of Illusions insures a place for Mahabharata in the modern bookshelf by baring a story that is incredibly true to humanity and intensely inspiring.

For graphic novel lovers, find a similarly intense (but not quite there) Draupadi: The Fire Born Princess

The Queen of The Tearling [Tearling #1] by Erika Johansen: A review

The Queen of the Tearling (The Queen of the Tearling, #1)The Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen
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Genre : Fantasy, Magic
Audience: Mature (18+)
Type : Series (Book 1)
My rating: 5 of 5 stars ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
Buy Online: Flipkart, Amazon

 

An incredibly intense fantasy story that is partly coming-of-age and partly magic. It has everything – adventure, thrill, mystery and a beautiful romance.

I loved this book from the first page. I just knew that any book that begins with a nice map was going to be an epic read. And I was right!

This book has all the making of the first book in a series –
1) introduces characters
2) keeps the background of characters a secret (to be revealed in book 2 and 3)
3) sets up the pre-war scenario
4) raises more questions than answers (again, to be revealed in book 2 and 3)
5) has humor

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This was not an easy read. I had to plough through chapters that spoke of some terrible things. It was definitely for mature audiences. The plot kept me at the edge of my seat because it had many unexpected and unpredictable twists. The pacing was a slow-burn. It took its own time to set-up events and introduce characters. I loved the characters especially Carlin and Barty whose characters were developed without even their presence. If that isn’t good writing then I don’t know what is! The story carried an excellent narrative that (despite its slow pace) didn’t bore me at all. There was enough history, background and mystery to keep me engaged.

My Reading Experience:

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Things I liked about the book –

1) The chemistry between Mace and Kelsea
2) The mysterious magic
3) Kelsea’s humour
4) Badass heroine
5) Badass heroine’s love for books
6) Treason (what good is a royal story without treason?)

I would say that after reading the likes of Harry Potter and The Kingkiller Chronicles, I was starved for some good magic fantasy series that isn’t fully YA and The Queen of Tearling was the perfect answer.

The Queen of The Tearling was like taking the first bite of home food after being away for so long. It satiated my hunger of magic, fantasy, historical fiction, medieval times and royalty.

Emma Watson has agreed to do a film series of the same name!! She said this back in 2013. The movie is still under works and I’m hoping it will come out soon. See what she said about this series (I couldn’t agree more)

queen

The Selection [The Selection #1] by Kiera Cass: A review

The Selection (The Selection, #1)The Selection by Kiera Cass
My rating: 1 of 5 stars
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What a complete rip-off!

I can’t even begin to tell you how much this book plagiarized The Hunger Games – the unwilling girl selected at ‘random’ from different castes; the girl doing this for the family’s sake so that they can have a little more money; the love interest back at home and the royal love interest; the love triangle; the interviews, and the attention to the dress!

I can’t even. No.

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All this book is a pretty cover to look at. Just as shallow as the vicera. I can truly say that the enchanting book cover is all there is to it and I would much rather look at the pretty covers for hours than read another installment of The Selection.

It was such a mistake to pick this up. It’s not at all what I like to read.
Sorry The Selection fans, I am going to pass.

The Hobbit by J.R.R.Tolkein: My journey

The Hobbit (Middle-Earth Universe)The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
My rating: 4 of 5 stars⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
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I’m just happy to have read this book. It has been an honor to read Tolkein’s work. An incredible journey of Bilbo Baggins, the Hobbit and the thirteen dwarves. There can be no greater pleasure than to just read one of the best literary works.

 

Here is my journey –

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White Teeth by Zadie Smith: A review

White TeethWhite Teeth by Zadie Smith
My rating: 4 of 5 stars ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐
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White Teeth is the story of three families – the Jones, the Iqbals and the Chalfens – in post war England. And my, what a story they each have to tell! 
Overall review:
As a reader, you have to give this book some time. It is a slow, SLOW read, but trust me, it gets better.

You see, when I was reading White Teeth, I didn’t feel like reading any other book. It felt like I was somehow cheating on this incredible book somehow, and some part of me was also afraid that Alsana was going to jump out of the pages and scold me. Yes, it was that gripping. And I was completely invested in this tale for as long as I read it.

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In-depth review:
The book starts off with the first generation Jones and the Iqbals and how they come to be good family friends. In the first few chapters, the narrative of Mr.Archie Jones is – how do I put this – quite bland. It was really boring, much like the English with their stoic faces and stiff upper lips. I can understand how many readers would fall off at this point.

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Somehow, I persisted. And boy, am I glad that I did. As we read about their lives, we begin to understand the real problems of immigrants from the Iqbals’ POV. Samad Iqbal! You wacky, sonorous, proud but dirty fascist! Oh, don’t look at me like that. If you read his story, you would say the same of him too. What I loved about White Teeth is that, the entire voice of the book changed when it switched from Archie’s to Iqbal’s narrative. Suddenly, the lines were alive and animated. The parts with Alsana and Iqbal are truly rib-tickling. I could almost recite word for word what Alsana would say. This husband-wife duo were one of the most realistic couples that I’ve ever read.

Some of the laugh-worthy moments are in the beginning of Samad’s narrative. Although I appreciate the heavy dose of humor, I felt like the novel housed all possible jokes on Indians/English. Sometimes, even at the expense of the progress of the story.

Speaking of humor, it was so readily available. The setting was already there. The jokes are already there. All Zadie has to do was juxtapose of the two different worlds of the ruddy English and the grovelling Bangladeshis, to create comedy. Zadie did an excellent job. Her understanding of the many cultures and the human equations in each culture is extraordinary.

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The story was forever branching out into distant arcs, anecdotes and facts. But it was fun. It kept me engaged. Zadie, the storyteller, also knew how to bring the reader’s focus back. So that was good.

 

The thing about White Teeth though, is that there is no real plot. It’s only an account of the lives of the two families in London. It was a fresh take on modern novels. I was growing tired of cliffhangers and villains who threatened to destroy the world. This novel is such a humble hat tip to Dickens and his like. I always love stories which have humor at their heart. In this story, there are so many complications and terrible things that happen to the characters, but Zadie found the funniest perspective in all of them. Kudos!

white-teeth-reading-progress-3

I expected more out of Irie because of the mix up in her genes. A great combination of fire and ice in the half-jamaican and half-British girl. But she was a major disappointment. Irie could’ve been much more. I wonder why Zadie didn’t do anything there. Character-wise, Samad stole the show for me. Followed by Alsana. Incredible house wife portrayal.

Overall, White Teeth feels like an unhurried story that goes into many details. A story we can sit and read for days at leisure. A languid slice-of-life tale that helped me understand fascism from the grassroots level.

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The best part about white teeth is that there is no plot per se but you will want to keep reading chapter after chapter to find out what is happening. Kinda like what you’d have in classics like Jane Austen’s or Charles Dickens’ works. So rare to see such work in post modern times where authors use cliffhangers like condoms. Way to go Zadie! Well deserved debut novel award.


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